How do Social Services adjudicate whether your child is a Child in Need?

The legal definition of a “Child in Need” is given in Section 17 (10) of the Children Act 1989:

“Previous solicitors
made me feel like
I was on my own
and left my case in
a mess. Lucy fights
my case and cares
about me. The firm
is family orientated
and understands me
more than any
other solicitors.”Our client, Claire

“As a child shall be taken to be in need if:

(a) he is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or to have the opportunity of achieving or maintaining, a reasonable standard of health or development without the provision for him of services by a local authority;

(b) his health or development is likely to be significantly impaired, or further impaired, without the provision for him of such services; or

(c) he is disabled”

In the context of this Part of the Act:

by “health” is meant physical or mental health;

by “development” is meant physical, intellectual, emotional, social or behavioural development; and

by “disabled” is meant blind, deaf or dumb or suffering from mental disorder of any kind or being substantially and permanently handicapped by illness, injury or congenital deformity or such other disability as may be prescribed.

Brendan Fleming Solicitors are nationally recognized as a leading choice in the area of care work. We are justifiably proud of our expertise and our success rate. We are contracted to the Legal Services Commission for this type of work and are considered to be one of the leading national firms for publicly funded services.

Our principal, Brendan Fleming, has won a reputation for his innovative approach, spearheading many new ways of securing justice for families caught in the care proceedings trap. He is a member of a select children’s panel and recognized and approved by the Law Society.

If you need a Care Proceedings Solicitor to help you, contact Brendan Fleming today:

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