Established in 1982, at Brendan Fleming Solicitors we specialise in Family Law, offering our clients expert legal advice in both Public and Private Law matters, including Care Proceedings, Non-Accidental Injury, Divorce & Children’s Proceedings and issues with Social Services.

 

Contact Brendan Fleming Solicitors by emailing info@brendanfleming.co.uk or by calling 0800 246 5147

 

Contact our Non-Accidental Injury Department on 0800 246 5147 or 07730 143 432. If it is out of hours, you can call our staffed 24 hour helpline on 0121 683 5000. Alternatively you can email us on help@nonaccidentalinjury.co.uk

Our Location

165 Newhall Street
St. Paul’s Square
Birmingham B3 1SW

 

0800 246 5147

 

info@brendanfleming.co.uk

 

Post-Adoption Contact

The Children and Families Act 2014 concerns itself, amongst other things, with adoption reform; but what are the changes concerning post-adoption contact with children?

 

Post-adoption contact has been, till now, legislated for by the Children Act 1989.  It was a matter covered by Section 8 of that Act, with individuals being granted post-adoption contact through application for a Section 8 Order.

 

Part 1 of the Children and Families Act 2014, which concerns itself with Adoption and Contact, and specifically Section 9 which covers Contact: post adoption, has amended the Children Act with regard to this matter.

 

A new section 51A has been inserted into the Children Act, which provides for “the making of orders which deal with contact arrangements at the adoption order stage and subsequently” between an adopted child and the person making the application.

Those who may apply for such contact are limited and include “relatives of the child (by blood, marriage or adoption), any former guardian, any person who had parental responsibility for the child immediately before the adoption order, any person who was entitled to make an application under Section 26 for contact with a child placed or to be placed for adoption and any person whom the child has lived with for at least one year.”

 

In considering the application, the court must bear in mind the possible harm that might be caused to the child by the proposed application, the applicant’s connection to the child, and any representations that are made to them by the child, the person who has applied for the adoption order or the child’s adoptive parents.

 

On the reverse side of the coin, Section 51A is also the section to be used in applying for an order prohibiting post-adoption contact.

Contact Us In Confidence

Arrange a consultation – 0800 246 5147. Or email us at info@brendanfleming.co.uk